Categories
Dialogue Fiction

Overflow

Glenn: “You would expect an imposing house from him, right? One-per-center type money, so something ostentatious, but I couldn’t believe my eyes when I got there. Simple to the point of boring. Custom built, yet so lacking in style most people wouldn’t even give it a glance.”

Moria: “Maybe that was the point? Plus, who could say if the inside wasn’t a gilded showpiece? Kind of like people, if you ask me. The outside never tells the true story.”

Glenn: “Okay. Okay. I can go with that, but don’t try to tell me he’s a decent, ethical person. He’s done too much damage.”

Moria: “Rumors. Poorly-sourced gossip that too many people are ready to believe because it makes them feel morally superior.”

Glenn: “This is what I love about you. Optimism tempered with a deep understanding of people. None of which explains why you are with me.”

Moria: “Going against my own advice, I guess. There’s no easy box for love. It overflows.”


© 2022 Jeff E. Brown. All rights reserved.

Categories
Fiction Prose

The 216

Man: “You get what you deserve, mostly, but it’s when you don’t that life starts to get interesting. The pendulum swings dark and also back to the light. You seem to catch the shadows, it’s true, but this time I see a glimmer.”
“There is hope in the unexpected, and though you might be skeptical right now, I urge you to open your mind. I realize sitting here in the rain at a bus stop may not exactly be a pulpit, but you take the moments you have to make your points. And you have a chance to get out now and run towards a future. An actual life where you might find some peace and even a little happiness. What are you waiting on?”

Teenager: ”The bus, you nutter.”


© 2022 Jeff E. Brown. All rights reserved.

Categories
Dialogue script

No Time for Dessert

Drew: “You don’t ruin an entire meal over ancient family drama.”

Camille: “You most definitely do, particularly when that drama-as you call it-concerns what your Father may or may not have done in the army.”

Drew: “Right. May or may not have done. We can’t go by Mom’s recollections. Not with her history.”

Camille: “He was the one with a track record of lying when it suited him. That much is fact. He lied to everyone we know, sometimes about stuff we were there for. He was shameless.”

Drew: “It doesn’t mean he was guilty of war crimes.”

Camille: “I never said that. Just that the things he supposedly told Mom would probably have gotten him sent to Leavenworth, or worse.”

Drew: “That is being dramatic. It was a war, which is not something you or I have any experience with.”

Camille: “That makes it all okay, yes? Rape, pillage, murder. Fog of war and all that?”

Drew: “Of course not, but we don’t actually know that his squad did that shit. He’s not here to defend himself. And Mom would still like to shovel dirt on his grave.”

Camille: “Guess it’s clear whose side you are on.”

Drew: “It’s not about sides. It’s about letting shit go. I can’t hold on to all of this anger and negativity. I am done with it.”

Camille: “I can’t just put my feelings in a box and pack them away like that. You can and maybe I need to work on that, but I refuse to admit that it doesn’t matter whether our Dad was a twisted fuck. Frankly, we already knew he was a pretty lousy person. We did grow up in the same house, did we not?”

Drew: “I will admit he wasn’t much of a role model. You got the worst of it because he was such a misogynist.”

Camille: “Thank you for that admission. Probably tough for you to admit.”

Drew: “Stop it. Quit acting as though I am the enemy. I thought he was?”

Camille: “Like you said. It’s ruined now.”

© 2022 Jeff E. Brown. All rights reserved.

Categories
script

Parting Ways

Jill: You’ve complained repeatedly that it’s not fair. That they changed the rules on you and never told you.

Kendrick: Of course they did. Would I have walked away if I knew that I would forfeit all of that money? You know me. The only reason I was there was the insane profit potential.

Jill: Okay. I can attest to your rather base motivations, but I also know these guys aren’t idiots. They had to see what you were capable of. Your reputation is pretty accurate at this point.

Kendrick: I guess they are about to get something they didn’t expect because I won’t be kicked to the curb like some flunkie.

Jill: Stay calm, here. Please. You can’t do anything to make this situation more volatile.

Kendrick: I would go with the word ‘violent’, but I get your point. I can’t just hide out and mope. I have to earn.

Jill: You telling me you have nothing squirreled away? This type of scenario has to have crossed your mind. You’ve made enemies, Ken. Literal, beat-down, long-ass -memory-type enemies. You have to lay low and plan out your next move, with a cool head.

Kendrick: I appreciate the advice. I do. You are a true friend and you know I can count them on one hand. I am going to let it marinate.

Jill: Marinate? You worry me when you resort to food metaphors.

Kendrick: It will be alright. I’m mentally tough and I have a respectable weapons cache prepped for the inevitable.

Jill: Death is the inevitable here.

Kendrick: I do have a will, so let’s wait and see what tomorrow brings.

Jill: Waiting for the inevitable. I only hope I’m not around when they catch up to you.

Kendrick: It’s not a goodbye, Jill. Just a goodnight.

© 2021 Jeff E. Brown. All rights reserved.

Categories
Dialogue Prose

Adrift

“I wouldn’t call it duplicitous,Shell. I’d call it a healthy dose of self-preservation.”

“You lied. So we can put that in any box you want since you are just doing what you always do: rationalizing. Its like breathing for you.”

“Maybe you’re mad because I ended up taking home more than you can make in a year, but don’t act like you don’t benefit when I score. Take a look at your bank account, dearest.”

“Money is not everything. I’d like to be able to rely on you like an actual partner and not just end up feeling like something bought and paid for, Bruce.”

“I don’t see you like that. I’ve never said that you are for sale and I sure don’t feel that way. You’re part of me. That’s why I say what is good for me is good for you.”

“But that still just seems like a way for you to go out and do whatever you want so long as I’m warming the duvet when you get home.”

“Don’t make it seem tawdry. I have to earn a living and you know what that entails. I won’t lie: I do hope you’re waiting for me every time I walk in the door. My heart races when I turn the key because I can’t wait to hold you.”

“Now stop with the sweet stuff. This is not a “happily-ever-after” scenario. There is too much of a grey area where our interests do not overlap.”

“Now who is sounding like the selfish one?”

“Wrong, Bruce. You don’t understand the first thing about being a single woman at my age. Particularly with my skill set and obvious desires.”

“Okay. I’m not a female. Shell, I can tell the difference, but it still does not make me the enemy. We have mutual benefits here. A give and take that is natural for two adults. Why rock the boat?”

“Because I’m already drowning and I need to swim.”

© 2021 Jeff E. Brown. All rights reserved.

Categories
Dialogue

Dean and Mary

Dean: “Yes, I am wearing a turtleneck. And you don’t have to laugh. At least it’s a nice color.”

Mary: “I thought we were going out. We can’t do that now.”

Dean: “Because of the turtleneck? Really?”

Mary: “I have standards and you should as well. You’re not a young man anymore, I realize, but the turtleneck is not in style. If it ever was.”

Dean: “No offense taken. None at all.”

Mary: “We all need honest friends. Especially in these troubled times.”

Dean: “It’d be less troubling if I could wear what I like.”

Mary: “But you want to look your best, right? Let’s just take a look at your closet. We’ll find something less nineties. Flattering for your profile.”

Dean: “We are going to sit in the dark for two hours and I should worry about my profile?”

Mary: “Love blooms in strange places, Dean.”

Dean: “I’m not blossom hunting. I just want to watch a movie. You’re the one looking for love.”

Mary: “Love? I’d settle for mild interest. I’m a twice-divorced, fifty year old woman. The clock is barely even ticking anymore.”

Dean: “Don’t throw a pity party here. You have your charms, you know.”

Mary: “Do tell.”

Dean: “Well, let’s start with your wit- pretty killer. And your calves are just right.”

Mary: “Thanks, but you’ve got no chance now. I’ve seen you in your turtleneck. It’s all ruined.”

Dean: “I’ll go change.”

© 2021 Jeff E. Brown. All rights reserved.